Suicide Prevention Week

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Suicide Prevention Week

National Suicide Prevention Week

National Suicide Prevention Week

National Suicide Prevention Week

National Suicide Prevention Week

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In today’s society, many teenagers and young adults suffer from some type of mental illness; whether it be anxiety, OCD, or depression. While some people learn how to manage it rather efficiently, it can be a painful task for others; leading them to fall in a downward spiral. Suicide is the second leading cause of death in the United States, approximately forty-seven thousand Americans have committed suicide within the past three years ranging from ages ten to nineteen. For some, they believe that ending their life is their only option, which is never the case; you only have one life, nothing more. Everyone matters and they have people in their life who are willing to help them be the best that they can be, as well as help them live the best life that they can.

Since it is suicide prevention week here at BCHS, Mr. Hinckley, our newest counselor, has prepared a presentation on how to help those struggling with thoughts of harming themselves. When asked what to do if you know someone struggling with suicidal thoughts, Hinckley said, “First reinforce that you really care about them.” He continues, saying that, “and clarify it if they say yes, try to get them some help.” Hinckley also said that, if you are trying to help someone who is dealing with suicidal tendencies or thoughts, you should “try to listen to them and ask them what they’re going through. You’re trying to hear all the things that are going on in their life to bring them to this point.” Mr. Hinckley also advises that no single person should feel someone suffering from suicidal thoughts should only rely on them for help; he advises on guiding them and listening to them, suggesting that they seek professional aid if they really need it.

If you or someone you know is struggling with depression or suicidal thoughts, feel free to contact the number provided below; which will direct you to the national suicide hotline. If you do not feel comfortable calling or texting the national hotline number, you may always schedule to meet with either Mrs. Bell or Mr. Hinckley in the counselor’s office.

Hotline Number (U.S.A.): 1-800-273-8255